What You Need to Know About Emission Testing For ESM Compliance

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Along with the EPA standards, there are voluntary standards that the industry has to meet as well. The Clean Air Act gives the EPA considerable latitude in setting the standards for different sectors of the industry. One of the areas it has jurisdiction over is industrial waste, including plastic bottles and polyurethane foam containers. In general, it is very difficult for facilities to comply with the voluntary standards, because companies are more concerned about the cost of ESM compliance rather than the overall safety of their operations. This means that facilities may not be very serious about meeting the deadlines for their pollution controls.

Emission Testing For ESM Compliance.

esm compliance

 

There is a great deal of confusion, and some confusion is caused by the fact that there is really only one standard that applies to most industries and their smoke emissions. This one called “charges,” and it require facilities to get rid of any excess carbon dioxide, sulfur oxide, or mercury in their smoke emissions. The standards themselves are very detailed, and they do not distinguish between “safe” levels of each pollutant, so all facilities are theoretically required to meet the same emissions limits. Unfortunately, the EPA does not regulate excess gaseous emissions from power plants, so facilities are often given a range that does not account for their emissions. The result is that they frequently exceed safe limits and put people’s health at risk.

Emissions of air and waterborne pollutants are a major concern for both industrial and household consumers, and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has been attempting to set industry standards in place that would require facilities to meet certain emissions limits. These agencies have continually noted that the current voluntary standard for most facilities is not a sufficient safeguard to protect public health or the environment. Under the federal law, there are two primary categories of emissions; those that harm humans and those that do not. The law allows for some degree of latitude when it comes to regulating industrial emissions, so the EPA tries to establish a level of protection that allows them to set industry-specific standards, but they also rely on industry to help them determine what those standards should be.

 

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